'Open' Detention

Is the 'open' detention centre on Nauru really open?
What does 'open' detention mean?
Are people free
to come and go as they please?
Are their lives still restricted? In what ways?

Nauru detention is #NoPlace4Children
It's #NoPlace4Anyone
Is the 'open' detention centre on Nauru really open?
What does 'open' detention mean?
Are people free
to come and go as they please?
Are their lives still restricted? In what ways?

Nauru detention is #NoPlace4Children
It's #NoPlace4Anyone

'Open' Detention

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Is 'open' immigration detention on Nauru really open?

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Is the 'open' detention centre on Nauru really ‘open’?

On 5 October 2015 – 48 hours before the High Court case on legality of offshore detention on Nauru was due to be heard – Nauru suddenly declared its detention centre ‘open’.

Has having an open centre changed anything?

The Legal and Constitutional Affairs References Committee — Serious allegations of abuse, self-harm and neglect of asylum seekers in relation to the Nauru Regional Processing Centre, and any like allegations in relation to the Manus Regional Processing Centre — Report (hereafter Serious allegations report) states:



… many … argued that the move to 'open centres' has largely been in name only. The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) stated that conditions are indistinguishable from those of the detention centre, noting in particular the number of guards, the configuration of perimeter fences, the sub-compounds and overcrowding of accommodation, and the use of communal tents for extended periods.


People still have to endure many restrictions including not being permitted to leave for various reasons, such as not attending a seminar, or briefings, people being screened on return to camp, and items such as Panadol brought into the camp being confiscated..

One former staff member stated:

Saying there are no children in detention because there is open camp (centre) is a gross distortion of the truth, a misnomer. Children (people) are still detained, stripped of civil liberties, and treated inhumanly. Open camp should be more appropriately termed ‘day release’. Not allowed money, not allowed bank account, restricted access to food and water, scanned with metal detectors in and out, not permitted smart phones and other contraband items eg knitting needles.


Within the RPC people cannot freely move between tents or go to certain places.

Sometimes people are housed in tents that contain others whom they fear.

Despite places being available in other tents where they can move, people have been denied the right to do so.

An 'open' centre is open in name only.

An island prison from which there is no escape is still an island prison, even without all the limitations placed on people in Nauru detention.

#CloseTheCamps

#BringThemHere

NOW


More information:

Is the 'open' detention centre on Nauru really ‘open’?

On 5 October 2015 – 48 hours before the High Court case on legality of offshore detention on Nauru was due to be heard – Nauru suddenly declared its detention centre ‘open’.

Has having an open centre changed anything?

The Legal and Constitutional Affairs References Committee — Serious allegations of abuse, self-harm and neglect of asylum seekers in relation to the Nauru Regional Processing Centre, and any like allegations in relation to the Manus Regional Processing Centre — Report (hereafter Serious allegations report) states:



… many … argued that the move to 'open centres' has largely been in name only. The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) stated that conditions are indistinguishable from those of the detention centre, noting in particular the number of guards, the configuration of perimeter fences, the sub-compounds and overcrowding of accommodation, and the use of communal tents for extended periods.


People still have to endure many restrictions including not being permitted to leave for various reasons, such as not attending a seminar, or briefings, people being screened on return to camp, and items such as Panadol brought into the camp being confiscated..

One former staff member stated:

Saying there are no children in detention because there is open camp (centre) is a gross distortion of the truth, a misnomer. Children (people) are still detained, stripped of civil liberties, and treated inhumanly. Open camp should be more appropriately termed ‘day release’. Not allowed money, not allowed bank account, restricted access to food and water, scanned with metal detectors in and out, not permitted smart phones and other contraband items eg knitting needles.


Within the RPC people cannot freely move between tents or go to certain places.

Sometimes people are housed in tents that contain others whom they fear.

Despite places being available in other tents where they can move, people have been denied the right to do so.

An 'open' centre is open in name only.

An island prison from which there is no escape is still an island prison, even without all the limitations placed on people in Nauru detention.

#CloseTheCamps

#BringThemHere

NOW


More information:

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: team@chilout.org